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Kingdom Come: How Often Is 'Kingdom' Mentioned in the Bible?

Discover the Kingdom's prominence in the Bible! Unveil the mysteries of the Kingdom of God and explore its biblical references.

Last Updated:
January 15, 2024
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8 Minutes

What Is the Kingdom of God According to the Bible?

The Kingdom of God, as taught in the Bible, is a central theme rooted in the teachings of Jesus. It refers to the reign and sovereignty of God over all creation, encompassing both the present reality and the future hope for believers. This Kingdom is marked by righteousness, peace, and joy in the Holy Spirit, as mentioned in Romans 14:17-18.

In the Gospels, the Kingdom of God is depicted as already inaugurated through the ministry of Jesus, bringing salvation, healing, and deliverance to those who embrace it. In Matthew 6:10, Jesus instructs his followers to pray for the coming of God's Kingdom on earth as it is in heaven. This highlights the present and future dimensions of the Kingdom.

However, in John 18:36, Jesus explains that his Kingdom is not of this world, indicating a differing perspective in the rest of the New Testament. This perspective often emphasizes the eschatological aspect of the Kingdom, portraying a future realization of God's reign over all things, as prophesied in Daniel 2:44.

The Kingdom of God, as presented in the Bible, signifies the rule of God in the hearts of believers and the promise of a future, eternal Kingdom.

How the concept of kingdom is portrayed throughout different books of the Bible

The Bible portrays the kingdom concept in various ways, each with its significance. The idea of the kingdom as a destination of perfect peace and harmony is found in books like Revelation, where it is depicted as the culmination of God's redemptive plan, a place where righteousness reigns and all sorrow and suffering cease.

In Psalms and Isaiah, the kingdom is characterized as a reign of God's justice and mercy, where the oppressed are uplifted, and the brokenhearted are comforted. The Kingdom of God is also portrayed as a spiritual reign, not of this world, emphasizing internal transformation and a commitment to righteousness and justice.

The kingdom concept is an integral theme in the Bible, symbolizing God's sovereign rule and the fulfillment of His promises. It represents a place of ultimate peace, justice, and restoration in the present and future. The portrayal of the kingdom varies throughout the Bible, offering multidimensional perspectives that reflect the complexity of God's divine plan for creation.

  • The kingdom as a destination of perfect peace and harmony
  • The Kingdom of God as a spiritual reign not of this world
  • The Biblical references to the kingdom

The Kingdom of God

The Kingdom of God is not just a mere concept but a real government ruling from heaven and accomplishing God's will in heaven and on earth. It is prominently mentioned in the teachings of Jesus, where he often spoke in parables to illustrate its nature and characteristics. In these teachings, Jesus emphasized the principles and values of the Kingdom of God, portraying it as a realm where righteousness, justice, and love reign supreme.

However, it is interesting to note that the focus on the Kingdom of God receives less attention in the letters of the New Testament. Despite this, the concept of the Kingdom of God remains central to the Christian faith and theology. It serves as a reminder of God's sovereign rule over all creation and his ultimate plan for redemption and restoration.

The Kingdom of God is like a divine government, with God as the supreme ruler and his followers as citizens who are called to live according to the principles and values of this kingdom. Through the teachings of Jesus, the Kingdom of God is not just a future eschatological hope but a present reality that we are called to embody and live out in our daily lives.

Key takeaways:

  • The Kingdom of God is a government ruling from heaven and accomplishing God's will on earth.
  • It is mentioned prominently in the teachings of Jesus, emphasizing its principles and values.
  • The focus on the Kingdom of God receives less attention in the letters of the New Testament.

Definition and characteristics of the Kingdom of God

The Kingdom of God is where God reigns supreme, and Jesus Christ is King. It is a central concept in Christian theology, emphasizing the rule of Jesus Christ on earth and in heaven. Living under His rule brings blessings and advantages as His subjects experience His divine love, grace, and salvation.

The Kingdom of God is mentioned throughout the Scriptures, with references in the Old and New Testaments. It was of great importance to John the Baptist and Jesus Christ, who both extensively preached and taught about the Kingdom.

The characteristics of the Kingdom include righteousness, peace, and joy in the Holy Spirit (Romans 14:17). It is a realm where God's will is done, and His perfect love and justice prevail. Jesus Christ taught that the Kingdom is not of this world but within us (Luke 17:21).

The Kingdom of God is where God reigns supreme, and Jesus Christ is King. It brings blessings and advantages to its subjects, and understanding its significance was crucial to the ministry of John the Baptist and Jesus Christ.

Key Takeaways:

  • The Kingdom of God is where God reigns supreme, and Jesus Christ is King.
  • Living under His rule brings blessings and advantages.
  • It was essential to the ministry of John the Baptist and Jesus Christ.

References to the Kingdom of God in various books of the Bible

References to the Kingdom of God can be found in various books of the Bible, each shedding light on the nature and significance of this divine kingdom. In Psalms, the righteous are described as inheriting the land and dwelling there forever, pointing to God’s kingdom’s eternal and unshakable nature.

The writer speaks of a Kingdom that cannot be shaken in Hebrews, contrasting it with the fleeting and temporary nature of earthly kingdoms. This highlights the stability and permanence of the Kingdom of God.

Matthew contains numerous references to the Kingdom of God, with Jesus Himself proclaiming its nearness and inviting people to seek it above all else. Revelation gives us a glimpse of the fullness of God's Kingdom, where He will reign forever and ever.

Isaiah and Zechariah also speak of the Kingdom of God, using rich imagery to portray a future where God's reign is established and all nations come to worship Him.

These references in various books of the Bible remind us of the enduring and transformative power of God's Kingdom, inviting us to seek first the Kingdom of God and His righteousness.

Key takeaways:

  • The Kingdom of God is depicted as unshakable and eternal in Psalms and Hebrews.
  • Matthew emphasizes Jesus' proclamation of the nearness of the Kingdom of God.
  • Revelation offers a vision of the fullness of God's Kingdom, where He reigns forever and ever.
  • Isaiah and Zechariah use rich imagery to paint a picture of a future where all nations worship God in His Kingdom.

How many kingdoms are mentioned in the Bible?

The Bible mentions two key kingdoms: the Kingdom of God and the Kingdom of Heaven. These kingdoms hold significant spiritual and earthly significance. The Kingdom of God refers to God's spiritual reign over the hearts and lives of believers. It represents the rule and authority of God over all creation. Scriptures such as Luke 17:21 and Romans 14:17 speak to the presence of the Kingdom of God within believers.

On the other hand, the Kingdom of Heaven refers to the future, heavenly realm where believers will dwell with God for eternity. It represents the ultimate fulfillment of God's promises and the restoration of all things. Scriptures such as Matthew 6:10 and Matthew 13:44 discuss the Kingdom of Heaven and its significance in the life of believers.

Key Takeaways:

  • The Kingdom of God represents God's spiritual reign within believers.
  • The Kingdom of Heaven refers to the future heavenly realm for believers to dwell with God for eternity.

What does kingdom represent in the Bible?

The kingdom in the Bible holds great significance as it represents a destination of perfect peace and harmony with the divine. It is portrayed as a realm free from evil and pain, where the Almighty's spiritual reign is experienced. Jesus meant for the kingdom to be accessed through repentance and righteous living. The Scriptures emphasize the characteristics and requirements of the kingdom of Heaven, highlighting the need for humility, faith like a child, and the importance of seeking righteousness above all else. It is where the last shall be first, and the meek shall inherit the earth. In the kingdom, love, forgiveness, and servanthood reign supreme.

Jesus taught that to enter the kingdom, one must be born again and follow His example of selfless love and devotion to God. The kingdom represents a state of being where God's will is done on earth as it is in heaven, and His glory is fully realized in the hearts of His people. Just as a symphony conductor orchestrates harmonious melodies, so does God bring all things together in perfect unity within His kingdom.

  • The kingdom in the Bible represents a destination of perfect peace and harmony with the divine.
  • It is a realm free from evil and pain, where the Almighty's spiritual reign is experienced.
  • Jesus meant for the kingdom to be accessed through repentance and righteous living.
  • The Scriptures emphasize the characteristics and requirements of the kingdom of Heaven.
  • It is a place where love, forgiveness, and servanthood reign supreme.
  • To enter the kingdom, one must be born again and follow Jesus' example of selfless love and devotion to God.
  • The kingdom represents a state of being where God's will is done on earth as it is in heaven, and His glory is fully realized in the hearts of His people.

What is the difference between the Kingdom of God and the Kingdom of Heaven?

The distinction between the Kingdom of God and Heaven is vital for understanding the theological nature of salvation and the afterlife. In various scriptures, the Kingdom of God is often used interchangeably with the Kingdom of Heaven, such as in Matthew 19:23-24 and Mark 10:23-25. However, a closer examination reveals their nuanced differences.

The Kingdom of God primarily emphasizes the sovereignty and rule of God over all creation, requiring individuals to be born again through faith in Jesus Christ to enter (John 3:3). It is typically perceived as inclusive of only saved individuals, representing those who have accepted Jesus as their savior and have undergone a spiritual rebirth.

On the other hand, the Kingdom of Heaven is depicted as including both saved and unsaved individuals, as seen in the Parable of the Weeds in Matthew 13:24-30. The characteristics of the Kingdom of Heaven underscore its comprehensive nature, encompassing all individuals regardless of their salvation status.

In summary, the Kingdom of God requires being born again for entry and consists of the saved, while the Kingdom of Heaven encompasses both saved and unsaved individuals. Understanding these distinctions is crucial for comprehending the theological complexities of the afterlife and salvation.

Key Takeaways:

  • The Kingdom of God emphasizes the sovereignty of God and the requirement of being born again.
  • The Kingdom of Heaven includes both saved and unsaved individuals and is comprehensive.

What did Jesus mean by the kingdom?

The kingdom of God as referenced by Jesus has various biblical interpretations. It is both a present reality and a future hope. Jesus' words to the Pharisees in Luke 17 emphasize the importance of recognizing Him as the King. He challenges the Pharisees to understand that the kingdom of God cannot be seen with the eyes, but it is within them and among them.

The present reality of the kingdom of God is that it is the reign of God in the hearts of believers. It represents the spiritual and moral authority of God over His people. However, it is also a future hope, as believers anticipate the coming of God's kingdom in its fullness, where there will be no more pain, suffering, or death.

Jesus' words to the Pharisees in Luke 17 serve as a reminder that the kingdom of God is not about outward displays of power or wealth but about internal transformation and submission to God's authority.

In summary:

  • The kingdom of God is both a present reality and a future hope.
  • Jesus' challenge to the Pharisees in Luke 17 emphasizes the importance of recognizing Him as the King.
  • The kingdom of God represents the reign of God in the hearts of believers and the anticipation of its fullness in the future.

URL: biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Luke+17&version=NIV

What are the keys of the kingdom?

The keys of the kingdom signify the authority given by Jesus to Peter, symbolizing the establishment of His church. This authority to bind and loosen in Heaven and on Earth, as mentioned in Matthew 16:13-19, is linked to the keys. With God’s backing, it represents the power to declare what is permitted or forbidden in the spiritual realm. This authority holds great implications for believers today, granting them the responsibility to operate in this spiritual authority. Kingdom living, therefore, means living in alignment with God's will and purpose, impacting the world by bringing Heaven down to Earth. It involves demonstrating the values and principles of God's kingdom in our daily lives and influencing those around us. Believers are called to unlock the kingdom’s power and purposes as a key unlocks a door. In living as Kingdom citizens, believers carry the essence of the keys of the kingdom, exercising spiritual authority for God's glory.

What does it mean that the Kingdom of God suffers violence?

The Kingdom of God’s suffering violence speaks to the persecution and suffering endured by believers in the Christian faith. This metaphorical phrase, originating from the biblical text of Matthew 11:12, conveys the intense spiritual warfare and opposition those within the Kingdom of God face. It signifies the relentless attacks and struggles believers encounter as they strive to uphold their faith and values in a world that opposes and challenges them.

This phrase underscores the reality that those who align with the Kingdom of God will inevitably face opposition and persecution as they stand firm in their commitment to God's sovereignty and righteousness. It reminds believers to expect and be prepared for the trials and tribulations of living out their faith in a fallen world, urging them to stand firm and persevere amidst adversity.

The Kingdom of God’s suffering violence is a poignant reminder of the spiritual battle and hardships believers endure, highlighting the need for steadfastness and unwavering faith in the face of opposition.

Key Takeaways:

  • Believers in the Kingdom of God face persistent persecution and suffering.
  • The metaphorical phrase emphasizes the spiritual warfare and opposition within the Kingdom of God.
  • It signifies the challenges and hardships believers face as they uphold their faith in a world at odds with their beliefs.

Conclusion

The predicted future kingdom holds great significance in the Old Testament as it was a central theme of the prophets' messages. Their prophecies pointed to a time when God's kingdom would be established on earth, bringing peace, justice, and righteousness.

In the Gospels, the nearness of the future kingdom was emphasized by Jesus and His disciples as they preached the good news of the kingdom. Jesus used parables and teachings to illustrate the nature and characteristics of the kingdom, showing that it was not a physical kingdom but a spiritual one that would transform hearts and lives.

The preaching of the future kingdom had implications for its future restoration. It signified the fulfillment of God's promises and the coming of a new era. It also brought hope and encouragement to those longing for God’s reign to be manifested on the earth.

The predicted kingdom in the Old Testament and its nearness in the Gospels point to the ultimate restoration of God's rule and reign. It signifies the culmination of history when God's kingdom will be fully established, and His will be done on earth as it is in heaven.

Key takeaways:

  • The predicted heavenly kingdom was a central theme in the Old Testament prophecies.
  • Christ Jesus and His disciples preached the kingdom’s nearness in the Gospels.
  • The preaching of the everlasting kingdom had implications for its future restoration, bringing hope and fulfillment of God's promises.

References:

Mark 1:15

Matthew 4:17

Matthew 6:33

Mark 1:14-15

Luke 17:20-21

Matthew 3:2

Mark 10:14

Matthew 10:7

Frequently asked questions

How does the concept of the Kingdom of God relate to the idea of a spiritual kingdom and an earthly kingdom in the Bible?

  • The Kingdom of God is a concept that encompasses both a spiritual and an earthly kingdom.
  • The spiritual kingdom refers to God's reign over the heavenly realm, where righteousness, peace, and joy in the Holy Spirit are present.
  • The earthly kingdom is the Millennial Reign, a future period of 1,000 years where Jesus will establish His rule on Earth.
  • Both kingdoms represent God's ultimate authority and desire for a perfect and harmonious world.
  • Biblical references to the Kingdom of God emphasize its eternal nature and its transformative power.

What is the significance of Jesus encouraging people to pray for the Father's kingdom to come to Earth?

  • The significance of Jesus encouraging people to pray for the Father's kingdom to come to earth is immense.
  • Through prayer, we align ourselves with God's will and invite His kingdom to manifest in our lives and the world around us.
  • Prayer is a powerful tool that helps bring about the establishment of God's kingdom on earth.
  • It is a way for us to actively participate in God's plan and contribute to transforming our world into a place of righteousness, peace, and joy in the Holy Spirit.
  • By praying for the Father's kingdom to come to Earth, we open our hearts and minds to God's divine grace and love.

Can you explain the difference between the Kingdom of God and the Kingdom of the world?

  1. The Kingdom of God and the Kingdom of the world are fundamentally different - the former being one of peace, harmony, and divine rule, while human systems and desires govern the latter.
  2. Jesus taught us to pray for God's Kingdom to come to Earth, illustrating the connection between the spiritual and earthly realms.
  3. God's Kingdom will ultimately prevail, and Jesus will reign forever.
  4. We can embrace the Kingdom of God by striving to bring its values to the world.
  5. It is important to remember the profound difference between the two kingdoms.

What is the Millennial Reign, and how does it fit into the concept of the Kingdom of God?

  • The Millennial Reign is a 1,000-year period of peace and harmony where Jesus Christ's earthly kingdom is established.
  • This period marks the realization of the Kingdom of God on Earth, with righteousness and glory reigning supreme.
  • Believers and saints will inhabit this blessed realm, giving us a glimpse of the eternal Kingdom in Heaven.
  • It is God's ultimate plan for His creation and a time of unprecedented prosperity.
  • The Millennial Reign symbolizes hope and a better future for all believers in the Kingdom of God.

How does the Kingdom of God represent both a state of being and a definite place in Heaven?

  • The Kingdom of God is a spiritual realm where righteousness, peace, and joy in the Holy Spirit reign.
  • It is a place of perfect harmony with the divine and acknowledging the lordship of Christ.
  • Submission to God's authority is required to enter and dwell in this kingdom.
  • This state of being is not just a physical place but also an eternal destination.
  • Heaven is the definite place where those in the Kingdom of God will dwell for eternity.

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Christian Pure Team
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